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Educational Design
 
Design thesis: architecture college
Hello everybody

I'm a B.Arch. student (doing 4th year) and working on design topic "architecture college". An architecture college, in my view, should inspire students to have an open mind without any mental barriers. Especially studios should give them a sense of freedom. In my view, making students sit in a closed cube and expecting innovativeness from them is very unfair...

So I've decided to provide studios which have a sense of openness... So, I've provided studio aroud an open central courtyard with good landscaping so that students sitting inside the studio can view it and can also sit casually in the open courtyard and think. It's a very informal environment that I wanted to create. Since I have an open courtyard right in the centre of my studio and no walls between the courtyard and the actual drafting space, I have some problems to cope up like heat, rain and heavy winds. I could be able to find solutions to problems like heat and rain but could not solve problem of heavy winds especially during rain. Since I wanted to have an open space (literally open without even obstructions like glass walls etc.) without any barriers. I'm planning to give solutions through landscaping and wind channels but was not able to find solid information about wind behaviour and how to channel winds and also how to provide wind barriers at some places.

Can anybody help me? Please, this is very urgent; if anybody has a solution to this please e-mail it to me, its very urgent.

Thank you,
Anupama Kakarala
Responses
 
Design thesis: architecture college
Dear Anupama,

I like your idea of a studio open to a courtyard, but I'm not sure how good it'd be to have a studio that's open to the elements (rain, wind, etc.). After all, paper is what we use and paper will get wet and be blown away...

Why not consider an atrium? You can have your courtyard... and it can have a glass ceiling. You can incorporate your energy systems into the atrium as opposed to having to waste energy by heating or cooling it. (I'm not sure what kind of climate you're working with here, let me know). As for examples... The Graduate School of Design at Harvard University is one big atrium but it is not centered around a courtyard. The Bibliotheque Nationale de France is a beautiful library centered around a courtyard with pine trees, although the building is not open to the garden. The Torrent Research Center near Ahmedabad is a group of laboratories arranged around atria that help ventilate the building.

Ozgur Basak Alkan
Design thesis: architecture college
The wind direction in said site is supposed to be south-west in summer and north-east in winter. Now, proper barrier can be in said direction by adequate landfill covered with green lawn, further supported by wind braking line of trees at effective distance, up-load your drawings in group space in Archnet and let me know, I can help you in detail if needed, regards.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Thank you both for your response.

But, Ozgur, my courtyard dimensions are 8mx10m, will that be OK if I cover my courtyard with glass? I mean glass obstructs long wave radiation, so during evenings inside environment will be very uncomfortable especially in countries like india my site is in Madhapur, Hyderabad.

And Dushyant, I've given the same kind of solution to my professor but he wanted a solid proof for its performance. I mean, to provide such elements, I should know exactly how wind behaves on such barriers or channels and also as I told you about my idea of putting a long tower, I should know exactly how long, how wide it should be and also which shape can be more effective. For that I need to have detailed info about wind behaviour. I've verified many books but all the info I could is very general and somewhat vague. Anyway I'll upload my drawings and inform you. Once again thank you both for your response.
Anupama Kakarala
Design thesis: architecture college
Dear Anu,

I will look into the climate of Hyderabad. As for wind behaviour. Yes, you can have a general idea of how it behaves. However, you should be cautious about saying that air will go this way or that... there is a reason why there's an entire field called 'fluid dynamics'. Architects like to draw nice tidy arrows on their drawings to symbolize air and ventilation direction. Some of them are more accurate than others, but most of them (in my opinion) are wishful thinking (i.e. they want the wind to go that way).

But really, the only way you can get close to figuring out what may happen with the wind is by using software known as Computational Fluid Dynamics, such as Phoenics. And, believe me, it's not straight forward. (It's much harder to model a given site accurately then an interior space... check out the Research pages of the MIT Dept. of Architecture, Building Technology Program).

So, how do you and Dushyant convince your professor that the non-glazed solution will work? That there will not be any small eddy at the corner of your courtyard that will occasionally suck in a drawing or two?
Ozgur Basak Alkan
Design thesis: architecture college
You are right Ozgur, it needs a lot of research. I liked your idea of covering courtyard with glass, but is that OK if I cover my entire 10mx8m courtyard with glass? Will that not be a problem in the evenings? I mean, glass obstructs long wave radiation, no?

Students do work in the evenings too after college. So will that not be a problem? But I guess your idea is better than my idea of leaving it open. Anyway thanks for your suggestion.

Anu
Anupama Kakarala
Design thesis: architecture college
Enjoying the problem and way to solution one at times encounters. Finished studies 24 years back hence for me, I do not need to convince any proffessor, climate of Hyderabad should not have atrium covered with glass. Second, I do know people making model and putting in wind tunnel or even digital generation at times is possible to convince the jury. In practical life, a spot such as Hyderabad can have "scientific gas" based upon probabilities and possible solution by urban/architectural/landscape planner like me authenticating the solution that should work reasonably well.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Hello Mr. Dushyanth,

Can you please give me examples (buildings) where landscaping is used for wind channeling? I planned to put a long tower kind of thing in the centre (which is "y" shaped in plan) which i thought can channel wind to other directions but I've to know the technical details like how long and wide my tower should be (with reference to my building scale) to perform such function. For that I need to first to look at some examples where these kind of towers are used, to get the general idea about it and also I can convince my professor by showing them. So please kindly give me some examples which you know where such kind of elements are used.
Anu
Anupama Kakarala
Design thesis: architecture college
Well, in Australia the kind of wind break system was applied long back as described earlier, please find plan uploaded.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Please find again a sketch and formulas to derive various wind effects on face of a tall building.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
This sketch has flow field around a building.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Beaufort number defines the comfort aspect by wind speed/humidity etc. in this sketch, you shall find three d. airflow around a building. All this details are from the book "Architectural Aerodynamics" by R.M. Aynsley, W.Melbourne and B.J.Vickery published by Applied Science Publishers Ltd. London with Int. Cataloge No.0 85334 698 4. Use this book to convince the professor. I shall prepare schemes based on your Y shaped building and upload them very soon.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Anupama,

What about the afternoon 12'clock sun, you need to be comfortable while working and covering the coutyard with glass, it won't be courtyard give a thought...
Akil Seven
Design thesis: architecture college
I think I still have a point; here we go with the nice cute arrows that show air tidly moving around. Haven't we architects spoiled too many people's daily lives doing this kind of pseudo-science? Just look at the diagrams that Dushyant sent you; what happens when the building is surrounded by other stuff (other trees, other buildings, highways, etc.)...

If your building does not exist in the middle of a vacuum and you're concerned about wind, the FIRST THING you should do is to think about what's around it...

I.M.Pei did a building on the M.I.T. Campus. (see image) A skyscraper that is entered from an open lobby at the bottom. What he did not see, perhaps, was that there were two four-story buildings to its north, next to the river. So, the winds that came through the two buildings blew through his open lobby, making it impossible to open the doors. They then proceded by putting a huge sculpture by Alexander Calder (appropriately entitled 'Big Sail') between the two buildings and the tower to be able to ameliorate the situation. It still doesn't help it all the way.

First thing to consider for wind is what's around your building. Then, worry about your courtyard.

BTW, you can only prove that your scheme works by doing a Phoenics simulation or a wind tunnel test with a well designed model that includes a large portion of the surrounding areas. Any arrows you draw will just estimate the situation and cannot predict what happens at the scale of something small, like your courtyard.

If you want to cover it with glass, you do not have to just put a plain sheet of glass on top. (First, also, do tell me how tall this courtyard is too). You can do a sawtooth with windows on the wind-side, you can do a double glass roof separated by an air space (the wind will blow the hot air gathered in between.).

You know, I am more worried about rain and wind combined in your courtyard then just wind.

I don't see why you can't have windows on the studios facing the courtyard; people can open them when they want, close them during rains, etc. It will give them flexibility. You can make a nice, flexible window or glass door design. Either you put windows on your studios and give the option of closing-in your rooms, or, you find some flexible way of closing in your courtyard or, at least, providing the option by designing a retractable cover; it's small enough to do that.

And, I would not let anyone do your drawings, or 'solve' anything for you. Take suggestions, not spoon-feeding. For your own sake.
Ozgur Basak Alkan
Design thesis: architecture college
Well, nobody has and particularly me any interest in spoon-feeding anybody. As a student many times I have asked my teachers to take pencil and explain me in few schemes, put forward their thought or what they meant. Architects do have graphic way to explain. I am from a school of free-thought and expression, now... am I threatened? Please come back with proper answer, do not assume any thing... is this portal not for free architectural thought expression to elevate the standards of the profession? I am angered. Ok. Mr.Balkan.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Hello Anupama, get my details from profile and send me your address or e-mail to dushnath@indiatimes.com

I shall courier material for reference.

Regards,
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
Hi,

I think that air curtains can solve your problems to some extent as they can work as a virtual wall. When we provide such curtains to air conditioned spaces they can even control the wind flow.

So why don't you provide such transparent walls as thicker air shower which can be used during normal rain and wind conditions and can be removed during acceptible conditions. You can also adjust the air speed according to the outdoor conditions.
Divyanshu Sharma
Design thesis: architecture college
Thank you Divyanshu for your response.

But air curtains require additional mechanical energy, its an overhead. So, it may not be practically possible to use them in institutes.
Anupama Kakarala
Design thesis: architecture college
Dear Anupama,

Well I give you something to think upon.
vertical glass slabs pivoted both at top and bottom, 360 rotation. n number as per your span.

In this case you can channelise the wind in desired direction. You get 100% enclosure and transparency and reverse too.

Just think and sketch it out. Hope it will help you.

Regards
Karam
Karamchand Nanta
Design thesis: architecture college
Recently a 486 feet high structure at Paris. Very good treatment, observe a point at around 338 feet from ground going down as well widening to accomodate entrance foyer of the building and a large circular disc like foyer cover to protect visitors entering the building from gusty wind.
Dushyant Nathwani
Design thesis: architecture college
hi anupama,

i am a final year student of architecture. my thesis topic is campus design and i am looking for a site in andhra pradesh. as u have mentioned that ur site is near hyderabad, i would like to know more about it.can u please mail me the details about the site...it wolud be of great help for me.....thank you...
Divya Pathangay
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