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What are "urban building typologies"?
One of the essay titles for the fourth semester at Architectural Bachelor program is named following:

"Potential of brick-based structural systems in urban building typologies".

I am a bit confused by this term - "urban building typologies".
Can somebody explain it to me, what are "urban building typologies" in this context?

Thank you.
George Duma
Responses
 
What are "urban building typologies"?
Any help please?
Thank you.
George Duma
What are "urban building typologies"?
George, Typology is a fancy word for "type" and similarly Methodology is a fancy word for method, "-ology" just means "the study of".
Frank John Snelling
What are "urban building typologies"?
Thank you for the reply Frank

Would you be so kind to tell me to what types of building this thesis is referring to? I know this may not be enough information but, can you just say what kind of building types do you think?
Urban (cities) or suburban?
Civil buildings, town halls, or single dwelling houses in the suburbs?

Thank you.
George Duma
What are "urban building typologies"?
George, Today "urban" is usually used to mean any area in a town or city without domestic gardens, as opposed to the "suburbs" which are semi-urban areas with domestic homes and gardens and which surround an urban area. So this thesis is probably focused upon the larger and more public buildings.

"Brick-based structural systems" simply means the use of massive brick walls, piers, columns and arches to support large buldings.
Frank John Snelling
What are "urban building typologies"?
Thank you for the reply Frank.

English is not my first language so maybe I made a mistake: I guess "masonry" is the right term, instead of literal "brick-based" one. Sorry for that.

I am aware of the masonry term and it's meaning.

I just needed an explanations on the "urban building typologies" term.

Could you please be a bit more specific on the "larger and more public buildings"?
What exactly goes into that domain?

Town halls, cinemas, libraries?
What about residential buildings?


Thank you.
George Duma
What are "urban building typologies"?
Hi George,

"Building typology" in Urban context may refer to the spatial aspects of built forms in relation to and in the context of surroundings. This can be understood in a single dimension as well as in 3D (or may be 4D with time parameter included).

"Figure ground" of an area gives an immediate impression of different typologies. Eg., linear, radial, chaotic, organic typologies etc. This is direct contrast between the built vs unbuilt.

If you zoom in to more local level other dimensions such as spatial aspect could be termed as typologies. E.g., courtyard buildings, multi family buildings with terraces, closed or open buildings just to name some.

However, typology is a very loose term and should always be understood in context.
Sriraj Gokarakonda
What are "urban building typologies"?
:((( I have just spent most of the past hour entering a post here to both George and Sriraj and my post has just vanished into thin air. :(((
Frank John Snelling
What are "urban building typologies"?
In fact, I noticed that several of my earlier posts today did not move to the top of the list as is usual, so is there a problem with the Archnet website or with my PC?
Frank John Snelling
What are "urban building typologies"?
Hi Frank, it never happened with me. May be you should write to the administrative team expalining the problem. archnet@mit.edu

And it would also be helpful to use a notepad while writing long responses so that a copy can always be saved.

Awaiting your response on the original post.
Sriraj Gokarakonda
What are "urban building typologies"?
Sriraj, thank you for the thought. Here in Archnet, I usually put down my thoughts as I think them and hope that they are coherent. Contrarywise, when I am writing an essay, the very act of `putting my thoughts on paper` (aka virtual writing on a screen) allows me to reread and then adjust what I have written and using a keyboard allows me to make adjusts very easily, whereas, when I wrote thoughts down using a pen I would have to cross out and hastily scribble in adjustments / amendments. :)
Frank John Snelling
What are "urban building typologies"?
George and Sriraj, I will try to reconstruct what I meant to post a few days ago. Firstly, Sriraj reminded me I had forgotten that typology has a looser meaning, because I was thinking of building (function) types and not building (design) types. Both are "building typologies" which could easily become confused together (like race and culture), particularly when the area of study only looks at buildings within one climate (ie hot and wet, hot and dry, cold and wet, cold and dry, etc)... then design and function tend to merge together as something natural and normal.

Similarly, difference (or separation of concepts) should be applied to words used to describe "design" and or "function". For example, (affordable, ie rentable to the working classes) housing estates which were built mainly by local government in the Victorian, Edwardian and `between the World Wars` periods; have now been hijacked wholesale by being "rebranded" with the ultra-modern use of the word "social" which is now being applied everywhere (as though the word social implies some moral or ethical high ground), but which is a political misuse of the English language. Ironically, these `council housing` estates` rebranded as "social housing" have the most and worst record for anti-social behaviour, so perhaps today`s rebranding of these estates as social housing is an attempt to hide the dystopian reality.

George, yes you are right, by "larger and more public buildings" I did mean town halls, cinemas, libraries. But your question "What about residential buildings? opens up another and different `can of worms` because the word "residential" can be applied to many different forms of residence, from private houses with or within gardens (suburban), to private houses along streets (urban), to private apartments tiered above streets (urban), to semi-private houses / apartments with shared entrances and or shared gardens, courtyards (urban), to semi-public communal housing (both suburban and urban) with theoretically shared gardens / courtyards, etc.

Therefore, if you are going to use the word residential, you should qualify as being either private or public. And private / public spatial typologies come within Spatial Morphology. Whereas, on a functional level, semi-private / semi-public residences can be schools, prisons, hostels, hospitals, hotels, barracks, palaces, etc.

Lastly, I should mention the difference between urban and suburban areas. Suburban areas (situated either on the edges of tradtional urban areas or along mass transport routes) arose because of developments in transport and transport systems, first with the steam railways, then trams, the London Underground (railway) and buses.

I mention about suburban areas, because most of the Avante Garde turn their noses up at the very mention of the suburbs as though they smell something bad, because in their minds they equate the suburbs with the petty-bourgeous (pronounced "borgewa" I keep forgetting how to spell this word). In other words, working class people who by working hard have earned enough to buy their own home and are therefore "traitors to the working class".
Frank John Snelling
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