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Curiosity in architecture
I am a student in the final year of architecture. I have taken my thesis topic named curiosity in architecture. I need your help that how I should design to increase curiosity factor in my building type. Thanks
Haris Shah
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Curiosity in architecture
Haris, an interesting line of thought, because one could say two general rules: (a) "the older the building the more curious and more interesting the design" and (b) "the newer the building the less curious and less interesting the design."

For example, all to many modern buildings are nothing more than completely transparent (glass) envelopes which show everything inside and so there is no need to enter and observe such a building from the inside.

Whereas, the older the building the more opaque the walls become (minimal windows, etc) and the walls can and do change shape in unexpected ways within the building. So that to comprehend the design of such a building, there is a need to enter and observe the differences between the outside design and the inside design.
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
sir actually i born in karachi. there are less modern buildings in karachi, my idea was to design something new design form which never made in ihe city before because if a viewer sees something new design which he never visualize it , this thing can also create curiosity? my building types are car showroom and car museum.
Haris Shah
Curiosity in architecture
sir please guide me how i can create curiosity in my building types car showroom and car museum. if you have any thing related to my topic please tell me. i shall be grate full to you.
Haris Shah
Curiosity in architecture
Haris, What about researching for the "Art Deco" garages designed and built in the 1920s and 1930s in America, Britain and Europe?

These garages were usually on two levels with a motor vehicle ramp from the ground floor to the next floor.
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
As an afterthought upon rereading what I have written immediately above. May I suggest that the use of ramps rather than stairs in Le Corbusier`s designs comes from the then novel "car ramps" being built in urban garages (built to avoid the cost of vehicle lifts).

Thus, the use of pedestrian ramps in Le Corbusier`s designs becomes not only a significant feature of his multi-level designs, but also a design type of the time in which he lived.

It would be interesting to know which came first? motor vehicle ramps? or Le Corb`s people ramps?
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
Haris,

May I ask a question that pertains to you and to many others in the Archnet forum: How do you come to choose a thesis topic for which you have no ideas about? Why did you choose this topic?

A thesis topic should result for your interest and passion in further studying a topic or working out a design that embodies the issues that you find intriguing in architecture. Its not enough to just name a topic and ask for help. What are your ideas about this subject you are proposing? Present and respond to this and you may get an engaging response.

Congratulations to Frank who always seems eager to help and is very active in this forum. I would like to see some real issues offered by students who are working on a thesis and not just a title and a plea for help.
Shiraz Allibhai
Curiosity in architecture
Sir first of all i would like to thank all the architects in arch net who helps me regarding my thesis topic. sir I have chosen this topic by thinking about myself that what kind of nature i have,what things i like. the result of my nature was curious. after that i relate this nature to architecture. As studying architecture its my will and keen interest to design such type of building in which a learner or viewer visualize my building from outside and want to know what is inside the building and this can thing can be achieved by designing such type of building which a person never sees it before in an environment where he lives this factor literally increase curiosity factor. this shows my interest and this is what thesis all about.
Haris Shah
Curiosity in architecture
Sir, i think this thing can be achieved by providing hidden aspects inside the building,hiding your main entrance ,the front view of the building should looks different if you are visualizing it from far and should be different from the near like the Audi car showroom designed in Barcelona the front view of which seems like the lights of the front grill of the new Audi model car . puzzle shapes forms and buildings also creates curiosity, by playing with the levels in your plans by focusing on light impacts etc giving ramps winding spaces inside the building, these all are my ideas which i wish to do in my design.
Haris Shah
Curiosity in architecture
Thank you Shiraz :) Sharing and or exchanging views in this forum helps to keep my mind active and I enjoy engaging with other people`s views because I then think upon things I would otherwise not think upon. :)

Regarding "Curiosity in Architecture" I feel that any element of curiosity gives depth to architecture.
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
Haris,

Thank you for sharing your ideas. I would encourage all students looking for thesis help to contribute in the same manner. My sense is that given the state of architecture today, if you focus on proportions, materials, light and quality in general, your design will stand out from the mundane architecture that is all around us. This alone will bring the curiousity factor.

What are some buildings that have what you consider to have this curiousity factor? For me, it would certainly be Ronchamp, the Salk Institute and the Sultan Hassan Mosque in Cairo.
Shiraz Allibhai
Curiosity in architecture
Thanks Ali Bhai, As, in my research the buildings which i feel the curiosity factor are Audi car showroom in Barcelona, project of TNA arch built in Japan, Porsche museum,Gwenael Nicolas designs in Switzerland,C2 house in Yamanashi, Japan etc.
Haris Shah
Curiosity in architecture
Haris, further to my last post that an element of curiousity improves design. I should explain that such an element is but one of a group of elements.

In fact, both (a) "Too much of the curious within a design" and (d) "Too little of the curious within a design" are the no-design boundary states and should be avoided.

Whereas, both (b) something ordered within a curious design or (c) something curious within an ordered design; are design states.
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
Haris, On a technical point, given that the 1920s and 1930s were the start of architectural designs for not only self-propelled vehicles such as the motor car, but of the motorcycle and (self-propelled) bicycle. Then this must have forced the need for ramps between levels in buildings and therefore Le Corbusier`s use of pedestrian ramps in houses becomes more understandable.

Furthermore, a side effect of such pedestrian ramps would mean that wheelchairs, `bain-marie` (serving dishes in a hot water bath) trolleys and tea trolleys could be pushed up and down the ramps instead of installing lifts.
Frank John Snelling
Curiosity in architecture
an element of surprise and wonder creats curiosity......play and make it happen.
Dushyant Nathwani
Curiosity in architecture
I am a student in the final year of architecture. I have also taken my thesis topic named curiosity in architecture.At the current stage i am searching the case studies to find the design guide lines i-e what are the different space types and experiences and what to do in planning,elevation,section,entrances, approaches,public spaces,transitional spaces to generates curiosity?? who is the architect best known for creating different experiences generating curiosity??
Muneef Ahmed
Curiosity in architecture
Muneef, my vote would be for the bizarre and curious architecture of Gaudi [Barcelona, Catalunya, Spain] and Horta [France] together with the other continental european Art Nouveau architects of the period around 1900.

Similarly, the early work of Mies van der Rohe (even though stripped of ornament)arouses curiosity, unlike his later monotonous, megalithic, monoliths in America.
Frank John Snelling
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