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curved walls require less material and greater volume??
i was goin thru laurie baker's works while i found him stating that curved walls enclose more volume at lower material cost.. is it so?? can anyone explain??
Meera Venkat
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curved walls require less material and greater volume??
yes,it is true....take a circle,now get circumferance and hight and find the material you need to consruct and volume you get in the same cylinder....next take squre and hight again get the material and volume in squre cylinder,,,,now compare curved circle gives mire vilume covered than the squre cylinder.
Dushyant Nathwani
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
Meera, Another way of looking at this is to (a) draw a circle, measure the length of the circle, work out the area within the circle. then (b) using the length of the circle, divided into four and make a square, (c) the area of the square is less than the area of the circle.
Frank John Snelling
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
thanks for the reply and so are these curved walls cheaper to construct?
Meera Venkat
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
Hi Meera,

If you are an architecture student ask your professors about the principles of curved walls. No these curved walls don't come cheap as the labor needed to erect them is costlier & secondly it takes more time to plaster or clad such walls.
Mansoor Ali
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
baker ,did one 3 storied house at trivendrum on single brick thick circular wall with diameter of 60 ft,supporting rcc slabs,happens to be economical.
Dushyant Nathwani
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
Meera, The problem with curved walls is that mass production is not geared to supplying materials and products for curved walls. So curved bricks, curved glass, curved windows, curved doors, etc will cost more to make.

On the other hand, I would imagine a circular structure is more stable and less likely to fail in an earthquake than a rectangular structure.

My own solution to cater form the above is to suggest the use of hexagonal shaped building spaces which are more or less circular and allow for the use of normal building materials and products.
Frank John Snelling
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
Frank is right, the round shape is much more stabe. Bunghas performed very well in the Gujarat earthquake. But the roof is normally more complicated, depending on the roofing material, e.g tiles. Thached roofs are easy.
Norbert E. Wilhelm
curved walls require less material and greater volume??
Norbert, Thank you. One of the more useful bits of data I have learnt is that a flat plane is more likely to fail than a corrugated plane, or a plane that is curved, or a plane that has angles at intervals; because planes which are not flat therefore have inbuilt reforcement which works in a similar fashion to buttressing.
Frank John Snelling
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