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Professional Practice
 
music & architecture
What is your idea about the realationship between music and architecture or how music can affect on architectural process?
Farhad Shariatrad
Responses
 
music & architecture
Farhad, Architecture can be viewed as instant frozen music. Thus if a building "sings" to you then you are on the same wavelength as the architect.

Unfortunately today, harmony and aesthetics have been replaced by disharmony and discord because in the modern ideology there is no difference between beauty and uglyness. And because uglyness makes a bigger impact upon people then uglyness is "IN".
Frank John Snelling
music & architecture
To me music invovles tune, rhythm, and pace, while architecture includes material, space, and structure. Not difficult it is to find out coinicedence between the two.
Xiao Yin
music & architecture
the relationship between the architecture and music could be touched in some of islamic building such as this attached pic., not only the islamic ones but also in some of gothic buildings.
the relation seems in the harmony among the elements of the building, especially between the minaret and the dome.
Waleed Akef
music & architecture
it was 4pm, and i was barely out of my prolonged siesta when the mosques nearby started their call to prayer.

i don't know much arabic, but i believe the first lines started with "allahu akbar...." and so on...

now perhaps you've come across some published complaints about loudspeakers in mosques that can be annoying to surrounding residents. well, that experience was not for me to complain about.

it was amazing! four barritones just going about their duties at random timing! there was no orchestration, and yet it sounded like a deluge of deep tones harmoniously overlapping one over the other.

and the silence that followed afterwards.... it was stabbing! like an epiphany of some sort except that you don't know what hit you.

when i see a minaret, i sometimes strain to listen for that harmony. don't know what to make of this but to say it's probably just another way one can experience architecture.
Jofer Magsi
music & architecture
The work of an architect is an interdisciplinary field, drawing upon mathematics, science, art, technology, social sciences, politics and history, and often governed by the architect's personal approach or philosophy. Vitruvius, the earliest known architectural theorist, states: "Architecture is a science, arising out of many other sciences, and adorned with much and varied learning: by the help of which a judgement is formed of those works which are the result of other arts." He adds that an architect should be well versed in other fields of learning such as music and astronomy.

I copied from wikipedia
Achmad Sanad
music & architecture
Architecture is the mother of all arts and it is also the mother of all science (or maybe this is what as architects we like to think! :)) how ever the realtionship between architecture and music is none other than progression. how a good musical score progresses is quite similar to how spatial progression is achieved in a good building. similar to a musical score a good building will have a begining a middle and an end, progressing through anticlimaxes, and climaxes.
though architeture has been compared to frozen music, we should ask why architecture should be frozen? is it a static entity? cant architectue be music itself? dynamic,alive and throbbing!
combining space and time we could probably achieve a architecture which is truely dynamic. where the building not only progresses through space but through time aswell.
T C
music & architecture
i think the relation lies in the feeling....
when we close our eyes n listen to some nice humming or tune, u feel music.
same for any structure.. touch n go around and we can feel it, if its good..
Trupti Barakale
music & architecture
just something i came across,
"When space existed as a separate category, architecture was the art of space; when time existed as a separate category, music was the art of time. The realization of the deep relation between space and time as spacetime, and the corresponding parallel relation between mass and energy, challenges the idea that architecture and music are separate, and prompts us to conceive of a new art of spacetime: archiMusic. But while we can surely imagine such an artform, we have had no way to actually construct and inhabit the spatiotemporal edifices of that imagination. While our science examines microscopic and macroscopic regions of curved, higher dimensional spacetime, we build within the confines of the small lots of what our limited sensorium can comprehend directly. Even though we depend on devices that rely on phenomena at these other scales, our architecture does nothing to help us form an intuition of the larger world we know through our theories and instruments" - marcos novak
T C
music & architecture
If 'music is the flower of feeling', maybe we can say that Architecture is (or should be) the flowerbed of music.

Music, among other arts, helps us to feel. In my opinion, architecture should do the same.
Benito Castiglione
music & architecture
Farhad,

i'm wondering if you listen to music everytime you get down to the task of designing. and if so:

do you stick with the same type of music until the design is finished? or, do you vary what you listen to during the process?

will you say that you'd go for the same type of music even if you're now onto a different assignment? or, will you find the need to vary your music as well?

please try asking your colleagues the same questions, and share with us their responses. :o)
Jofer Magsi
music & architecture
For instrumental music, I like "The Silk Road" by Kitaro. :)))
Frank John Snelling
music & architecture
Architecture like music is based on structure, rhythm, solidity & space (sound & silence). Both act towards the well-being of man, or at least interact with man. They can drown man by their monumentality, or be built to measure.
I agree with some of you that both music and architecture have come a long way from representing beauty.. architects like Gehry leave little space for that and so do contemporary classical composers of music; cacophony is the order of the day. But so is the world today.
I would like to ask members what they think of Gehry's design for the Guggenheim Museum, Abu Dhabi. Can these spaces be air-conditioned? Are they set for a hot climate with all these surfaces exposed?
Nelly
Nelly Lama
music & architecture
I very much disagree with the assertion that architecture is the mother of all art!!

On the topic of architecture and music. The Alhambra is the supremem example of frozen music - it has cadences, rhythm, harmony in its form.
Naveed Ahmed
music & architecture
http://www.uga.edu/islam/IslArt.html

I believe there's an article which expressed the cliche of music in islamic teaching; abstract from the article is as below

`Music has traditionally been one of the more controversial issues in the Muslim world. While all Muslim scholars have always accepted and even encouraged chanting the call to prayer and the Qur'an, the permissability of other forms of music, especially instrumental music, has been problematic.'

however, can we defy the relation between music ( which is basically sound) with our living condition, thus affecting architecture. Can we defy music in architecture?
Kelly Kay
music & architecture
this is very strange. Beethoven went deaf and yet managed to complete a symphony. in his mind he can hear (or maybe "see") the music. now there's a website about teaching hearing-impaired children to appreciate music by playing the clarinet.
Jofer Magsi
music & architecture
hi Kelly.
how about your thoughts on that part about teaching the hearing-impaired to appreciate music? don't you suppose there's some 'magic' in there somewhere?
Jofer Magsi
music & architecture
beethoven wasn't borned deaf, he lost his hearing at the age of 31 and past away on the age of 57. His mind knows the sound of each and every note on the keyboard - that's the reason why he can keep on composing after he lost his hearings - but was tremendously dissapointed because he can never listen to the `magic' of the song created. Don't think this point is relevant to architecture... sorry.
Kelly Kay
music & architecture
The type of deafness differs from one individual to another. but there's an instrument which can translate pitches and tempo into vibration to allow hearing impairs to experience music.. which is like a tap of fingers on a person's skin.... which visual rhythm can be translated into architecture - yes - maybe that can be another way of translating music into architecture for the deaf.
abstract from :
ScienceDaily (Nov. 28, 2001) � CHICAGO (Nov. 27) -- Deaf people sense vibration in the part of the brain that other people use for hearing � which helps explain how deaf musicians can sense music, and how deaf people can enjoy concerts and other musical events. "These findings suggest that the experience deaf people have when �feeling� music is similar to the experience other people have when hearing music. The perception of the musical vibrations by the deaf is likely every bit as real as the equivalent sounds, since they are ultimately processed in the same part of the brain," says Dr. Dean Shibata, assistant professor of radiology at the University of Washington.
Kelly Kay
music & architecture
so there...
and it's all about vibes. :o)
Jofer Magsi
music & architecture
hi................
i am final year architecture sudent..from wardha (maharashtra,INDIA).....i want to do my theisis on musical architecture...n wants to concentrate on indian clasical music ....actually its in next semester..now m at training..at ahmedabad......
i want to incorporate indian classical music in architecture..through form, spaces, ....
i have to formulate the design programe.......so..please suggest me on this aim....thanks .....
Shraddha Pimpalgaonkar
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