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Sustainable Design
 
Urban versus rural sites
A design unless it is in an infinite space lies within some context. Design and context interact to create space.

Therefore what in your view are the differences between (brownfield) urban sites and (greenfield) rural sites?
Frank John Snelling
Responses
 
Urban versus rural sites
Would you say that brownfield/urban sites are palimpsests? In other words, an urban site is one which has been built and rebuilt over hundreds of years, slowly mutating to show contradictory traces of the earlier building footprints and roads, and thus is different from a greenfield site which has never been built upon?
Frank John Snelling
Urban versus rural sites
Can someone please explain the concepts and context of '(brownfield) urban sites and (greenfield) rural sites'?
P Das
Urban versus rural sites
I think one thing to stress is that the pollution can be "potential" or "suspected" and does not have to be proven before a site is designated as a "brownfield". This is primarily a result of the difficulty and costliness of measuring the type and extent of the pollution. That's why many have taken to use the word 'brownfield' as synonymous to 'urban site.'

But the term is most often used in reference to last/current use of the site. Hence, if there's a residence on a site that was formerly a dry cleaners, few would suspect that it is a brownfield site. Let us not forget, similarly, that many rural areas are potentially polluted by pesticides used in farming and may not be as 'green' as they appear to be.
Ozgur Basak Alkan
Urban versus rural sites
I was using the term generically, as a way to define the use and reuse of an urban area over hundreds and maybe thousands of years.

Furthermore, it is loglcal to assume there has always been human-hazardous pollution from urban-based industries even if the scale was much smaller in the past.

For instance, the Romans mined gold, silver, copper, iron, tin, lead, etc and were aware of the poisonous chemical effect upon miners and metalworkers.
Frank John Snelling
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