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Sustainable Design
 
Thesis: Nature and architecture
Hello everyone,

My thesis topic is for a Center for Environmental Education. I want to know various issues and aspects so that I can relate the final product with nature. How this can be reflected in my design?

How is the campus of a Center for Environmental Education is different then other campuses?
Jyoti Dulariya
Responses
 
Thesis: Nature and architecture
Jyoti,

NATURE: has various aspects of time and space. Time is evolution, and space is environment. When you put the two together, you get the amazingly dynamic complexity of ecology.

Therefore, evolution comes under the scientific umbrella of Biology split:- Botany (plants) and zoology (animals).

Whereas, environment is physical with geography, terrain and climate, and weather.
Frank John Snelling
Thesis: Nature and architecture
Check out CEPT Ahmedabad, and also different parameters that can enhance our environment.

In such a centre, you could probably emphasise more on awareness programs regarding everything that constitutes the environment: the living, the dead, the biodiversity, the habitats, their existence and their balance in nature which sustains our environment.
Shobha Narayan
Thesis: Nature and architecture
Have a look at Jordan's nature centers; we have several of them. Try the RSCN.

Also, think of recycled materials and basic materials.
Katrina Goussous
Thesis: Nature and architecture
Natural is all that is made by nature, as against the artificial which is a product of thought, a thought-out thing. Not everything made by nature is "pleasant," nor is everything pleasant so for every one else.

In Buddhist observation, the thought is the matter or the object of mind (the what of the minding). Therefore, thought is considered as material as all other five sensory objects are.

What is pleasant for everyone is that which has no thought-out value, like the rainbow colours or the sunset. It is so regardless of who is looking with admiring eyes. This is nature, the natural environment.

When an architect, who is the product of an elaborate training in thought-out construction, thinks of environmental architecture, the environment becomes the thought, and the thought becomes the design on the drawing board.

That is why, in the Buddhist perception, there is a distinction between art which happens "unasked-for," and "made-to-order" art. The art of "no-mind" is thus an unplanned response to an unasked-for inkling of a need.

You may find references to the artists preparing, or rather purging, "thoughtfulness" in Sanskrit literature. The late principal of Sanskrit College of Baroda University, Professor Lakshmiprasad Shastri, has compiled them in the book "The Descriptions of the Fine Arts in the Sanskrit Literature."

It is used as a text book in aesthetics for Fine Arts studies. In it there is a mention that one may fast for some time and withdraw in seclusion to allow the thinking brain to calm down.

This creative process is also similar to the conception of a child. Obviously the womb that is already impregnated cannot conceive again. That is why, in Buddhist and yogic perception of the minding mind, anything that is creative is that which is intuitive. And an intuition is practically: in (no) + tuition; unlearnt.

In our common expression, too, we do equate the natural with the untamed and the wild.

So just step outside of the brick and mortar mindset of design and let your creative impulses go wild. And you will experience that you, too, are not nature's stepchild.

Shailesh Dave
Thesis: Nature and architecture
The building allows inside to extend outside through proper openings, semi-covered spaces, and allows the outside to breathe life inside by natural elemental play.

The green standards which are yet to be developed, but are available through experimenting architects, should be imcorporated.

Oher campuses may have over-emphasized buildings, whereas your campus has to have nature playing an active role in its design.
Dushyant Nathwani
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