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Sustainable Design
 
Hyderabad wind catchers
I have seen many "wind catchers" where there is a narrow tower set within and protruding from a residence or residential multi-unit complex. The tower has a reflector or curved shape directing the cool breezes down the wind tower to cool the interior of the home. The caption for the pictures usually say, "This is in Hyderabad in South Asia." Being from the U.S., I don't know that much about that part of the world. There is a Hyderabad in both Pakistan and India. Which one utilizes the special wind catchers? I read an article about a different type of cooling tower in Iran. This was in the US magazine, Scientific American. It involved creating a thermo-siphon and having the air flow out of the tower instead of into the tower.
I would really like to know about which Hyderabad has these towers.
Thanks.
Michael Polka
Responses
 
Hyderabad wind catchers
http://archnet.org/shared/community-member.jsp?user_id=74320
Ozgur Basak Alkan
Hyderabad wind catchers
Thank you Ozgur Basak Alkan. I feel better about knowing where most of those wind catcher photographs must have come from. Does anyone out there know if they might also have these in Hyderabad, India? Are the climates similar?
Michael Polka
Hyderabad wind catchers
Hi Michael,

Have you ever used online versions of the Global Gazetteer, such as the one at http://www.fallingrain.com/world/? It has coordinates, maps and climate information down to the village level for all countries (mostly accurate). Wikipedia is another excellent free resource. Based on the web:

Hyderabad, Andra Pradesh, India is "situated on the banks of the Musi River on the Deccan Plateau in southern India. The city has a warm climate with mean annual temperatures of 80° F (27° C). Monsoon rainfall, occurring between June and September, averages 30 inches (75 centimeters)."

Hyderabad, Sindh Province, Pakistan "extends along the east bank of the Indus". "The days are hot and dry usually going upto 32°C, whilst the nights are cool and breezy. Winds that blow usually bring along clouds of dust, and people prefer staying indoors in the daytime, but the breeze that flows at night is pleasant and clean."

You can see nice satellite photos of both if you download Google Earth for free. The image on the upper left is from from Google Earth and shows the geographic context of Hyderabad in Pakistan :)
Ozgur Basak Alkan
Hyderabad wind catchers
Traditional houses in Yazd in Iran have wind-catchers as well. :)))

Plus, here in Turkey, it is normal to have air vents in all rooms which poke above the roof like chimney stacks and are covered by a small tin roof.

I am interested in "wind-catchers" because they were introduced on multi-deck wooden sailing ships about three hundred years ago to bring fresh air below desks in the Tropics; first as vertically-hung wind scoops, then as special vertically-hung wide canvas pipes and finally as metal deck funnels to scoop the wind below decks.
Frank John Snelling
Hyderabad wind catchers
Dear Ozgur Basak Alkan:

Thanks again for your help. However, I did use your suggestion and get GoogleEarth to look at Hyderabad in India. Thanks again to John Snelling for his interest also.
Michael Polka
Hyderabad wind catchers
Tradition of summer and winter in Hyderabad Sind.

I am a student of architecture and live a house have five wind catchers at Hyderabad, Sindh. So, I am sharing my little knowledge and my personal experience.

We Call "mangh" in our language, wind-catcher in English. It catches the air from the exterior and also brings the natural light inside the room.

In Hyderabad, mangh (wind-catchers) are located at the rooftop (with openable shutter), serving single story and multistory houses. Mangh working differently in cold and hot seasons.

IN SUMMER

We open the shutter before sunset around 5:00 pm and close the shutter next day morning around 11:00 am. In this season wind comes from the southwest, that's why mangh face the wind direction (see illustration).

IN WINTER

In winter, it works in reverse. We open the shutter at around 11:00 am and close the shutter at around 3:00 pm. From this we get the hot daylight b/w in this timespan ( because the sun is in the south). And, at the same time, wind comes from the north and this type of wind catcher never catches the wind in the winter because of walls (see the illustration).

This illustration shows 1950's skyline, which looks different from today's Hyderabad. This may be because of the populations were exchanged (b/w India Pakistan 1947), and people who were experts of making and using this technique have left.
Furqan Khatri
Hyderabad wind catchers
Furqan, Very interesting information. :)

I assume the wind usually or generally blows from one direction only? The round metal "wind catchers" or scoops on ships are rotatable, so winds and breezes can be caught from any angle.

Questions: Are there separate wind catchers for each room? and are wind catchers used on all floors?
Frank John Snelling
Hyderabad wind catchers
Each "mangh" (wind catcher) serves one room, in the case of single story house. And also one "mangh" for two or three rooms, in the case of typical multistory house.

E.g. In the case of a two story house: we create a close well from rooftop to the ceiling of first floor. And we make window on the wall of that well to connect the room of first floor.

Note: If the number of stories increases then the acceleration of wind will increase. (I will provide you the detail with illustrations of "mangh".)
Furqan Khatri
Hyderabad wind catchers
Furqan, Thank you :)))
Frank John Snelling
Hyderabad wind catchers
Dear Furqan Khatri:

Thank you for your response, also thanks to John Snelling.

I take it that no one confuses wind catchers in Sindh province with those that may or may not exist in Hyderabad, Andra Pradesh, India. Still no luck as to the existence of the mangh there.

I see how in summer the wind catcher seems to work well as a simple thermosiphon venting device regardless of wind direction. However, as J.F. Snelling suggests, the mangh must be located in a very well researched direction in Sindh because a permanent opening construction only allows wind at -- I would guess -- angles of up to 30 to 50 degrees of direction? Perhaps the somewhat diamond shaped "deflector" that I see in your photograph is operable?
Michael Polka
Hyderabad wind catchers
I belong to Hyderabad, India. I have not come across any such wind catchers in traditional residences. However, the CII-GBC building in Hyderabad has scientifically designed windtowers to perform the function of cooling interior spaces for entire building. These towers have small fans and water sprinkled on intermediate material to cool the wind further. Another project which has incorporated passive wind towers is the Karnataka State Housing Corporation's Office building, which has several of these at intervals to provide cool breeze to the floors below. They are supposed to create a reduction in interior temperature of up to 10 degrees celsius. There are many more modern structures which have incorporated these, but in most parts of India, the traditional method was always through the central open to sky courtyard which suited the climate best.
Jaya Susarla
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